Incassable

One of the flash sales right now on One Kings Lane (one of my favorite on-line shopping sources) is Duralex glassware. Duralex forms a link between my childhood and my present. As the fourth of five kids, three of them boys, I saw a lot of broken glasses. Tip a glass of milk over at the dinner table and it was a goner. Bang it against the edge of sink during a resentful round of you-wash-and-I’ll-dry and there was one less glass to wash or dry forever.

And then came the four tall Duralex glasses. They lasted and lasted and lasted. I remember tipping them up to read the name on the bottom, curious about these virtually indestructible glasses. Made in France, I noticed, long before I had a personal interest in l’Hexagone. Many years later, once I started to visit the home of my heart, I noticed Duralex glasses everywhere. Every café served jus d’orange in them in the morning or limonade in the afternoon.

Duralex glasses are the perfect marriage of style and function. The company was founded in 1939 in La Chapelle-Saint-Mesmin near Orléans. All of their products continue to be made 100% in France. Through the wonder of tempered glass, they work for hot or cold beverages, withstand the microwave or freezer, and they’re dishwasher safe and stackable. There’s a whole range of dishes and serving bowls to choose from in addition to the classic glasses.

Today’s word, incassable (ahn-kas-a-bluh), means “unbreakable.” While Duralex only claims to be 2.5 times stronger than regular glass, they came pretty close to being unbreakable in my family.

Duralex Picardie 5 ¾ ounce clear tumbler – set of 6

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About Patricia Gilbert

Patricia Gilbert is a French teacher. She's Canadian, lives in the United States, but dreams of living in France. Follow her on Instagram @Onequalitythefinest and on Twitter @1qualthefinest.
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One Response to Incassable

  1. Pingback: Stealing a little French home style - Dekko Bird

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