Une Marquise

I learned a new word from my bedside reading book on architecture (Grammaire des Immeubles Parisiens: Six siècles de façades du Moyen Âge à nos jours, by Claude Mignot).

Une marquise (oon markeys) is a glass canopy over an entrance, usually in a fan shape, with ribs made of forged iron.

If you see an original, the building probably was built in the 19th century.

Here’s one from my neighborhood in Paris.

The early 20th century glass-canopied art nouveau metro stations by Hector Guimard aren’t truly marquises because they aren’t attached to a building, but they bear similarities.

You see examples of this style in cities other than Paris. Here’s a photo of a marquise on Walnut Street in Philadelphia from the same era. They’re like jewelry, aren’t they?

Grammaire des Immeubles Parisiens: Six siècles de façades du Moyen Âge à nos jours, by Claude Mignot

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About Patricia Gilbert

Patricia Gilbert is a French teacher. She's Canadian, lives in the United States, but dreams of living in France. Follow her on Instagram @Onequalitythefinest and on Twitter @1qualthefinest.
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2 Responses to Une Marquise

  1. Love this. Is that book available in the U.S.? I’d like to add it to my Christmas wish list.

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