Ce qui est pris n’est plus à prendre

EssexOn Saturday, I spent an enjoyable day poking around antique shops in Essex, Massachusetts. We saw a portrait that we liked very much, but we wanted to think it over.  Then I learned a very à propos phrase on the French news in a report about the Paris flea markets: ce qui est pris n’est plus à prendre (suh key eh pree neh ploo ah prawndruh). Literally, it means “that which is taken is no longer to take.” Idiomatically, you could translate it as “get it while you can.” I wonder if that portrait will still be there if we go back for it.

616yBxB9PRL__SL75_Markets of Paris

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About Patricia Gilbert

Patricia Gilbert is a French teacher. She's Canadian, lives in the United States, but dreams of living in France. Follow her on Instagram @Onequalitythefinest and on Twitter @1qualthefinest.
This entry was posted in French Vocabulary, Idioms and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

4 Responses to Ce qui est pris n’est plus à prendre

  1. Norman Ball says:

    There was a time when I did a lot of buying and selling. Some of my smartest and dumbest decisions were made in a hurry. And, some of my smartest and dumbest decisions were made after considerable reflection. So what did I learn? Enjoy the hunt and you can’t win them all.

  2. Mariaroza Opperman says:

    Thank you Patricia for your blog, really enjoy all you write about. Mariaroza Opperman

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